VTM 5 Round 6: The Championship tightens at Fuji!

Round 6 of the Virtual Touring Masters went East on February 12, heading to the 1992 layout of the Fuji International Speedway! The 34-lap race was another high speed affair, Fuji’s insanely long front straight providing some surefire drafting opportunities.

The Ford Capris had the way of it at the front, with John Munro taking pole and Rob Taplin in 2nd. 3rd went to Ross Mcgregor and 4th was taken by Jesper Taulborg, while the 5th grid position was taken by the Toyota Celica of Robert Wiesenmueller. Gary Lennon lined up 6th, while 7th and 8th were taken by Mate Orban and Anders Nillson. Matt Richards and Bruno Sousa Ferreira rounded out the top 10.

The start was mostly run-of-the-mill, save for Taplin having a horror first lap. Taplin got off the line more slowly than anticipated, then overshot turn 1 and made contact with McGregor, pitting at the end of lap 1. The Capri driver then got a further penalty for exceeding the pit speed limit, an event that drew the ire of the driver after the race due to confusion over what the pit speed limit actually was. In later laps, contact with Raul Pereira left Taplin in the wall with massive damage.

Mate Orban had a terrible second lap – after misjudging his braking for turn 1 and running into the gravel, he later locked his rear wheels and spun. To add insult to injury, an odd physics glitch saw Orban flip as well. Erik Tveit, by comparison, was enjoying a BMW M1 that had a clear advantage in a race situation. Tveit found himself in 5th by lap 6, a substantial improvement on his 11th place starting position. Wiesenmueller dropped from 3rd to 7th after suffering a spin, while Munro and McGregor maintained their lead. Richards found himself in 3rd thanks to the aforementioned incidents.

After a manic opening stage, the race began to settle into a consistent rhythm. Wiesenmueller began a quest to gain back positions – the championship fight was hanging in the balance, and McGregor being in front of both Wiesenmueller and Taulborg meant that there was great potential for a shakeup. Turn 1 caught out drivers a few more times, Tveit and Richards overshooting and handing positions over, and Nilsson accidentally shifting into reverse under braking, causing an understandably major spin.

By lap 20, the championship contenders were maintaining the pace, with Wiesenmueller closing in on Taulborg bit by bit. McGregor got within 2 seconds of race leader Munro when the latter suffered a slight spin, which was the latest in a consistent pattern that suggested that the Capri drivers were having issues with rear brakes. Matt Richards, having tyre issues, elected to pit for fresh rubber. Unfortunately, he too was caught out by the vague pit speed limit rules, having to serve a penalty afterwards.

Wiesenmueller dropped to a 5 second gap to Taulborg as McGregor continued to pursue Munro for the win. It was speculated that with the high loads given by Fuji’s fast corners, tyres would come into play late in the race, and this seemed to be happening to Munro. The gap to McGregor had dropped to just over one second by lap 29, setting the top two up for an epic slipstreaming battle.

This eventuated, with McGregor closing the gap up to 0.5 seconds by turn 1 on lap 30. From then on it was only a matter of staying behind Munro, and McGregor jetted past around the outside of turn 1 on the following lap. Unfortunately, after that, Munro’s composure broke, and the Capri driver spun. Perhaps to Munro’s relief, he was far enough ahead that he did not immediately lose 2nd place to Taulborg. However, Taulborg got by on the last lap thanks to Munro’s rear tyre issues.

Up the front, Ross McGregor took his 3rd TPS win, with Jesper Taulborg in 2nd. John Munro took 3rd, while Robert Wiesenmueller finished 4th. David Jundt finished an impressive 5th.

Your top 5 in the championship standings remain as they were after the last round at the Osterreichring: Taulborg leading on 148 points, Wiesenmueller in 2nd on 140, McGregor in 3rd on 133, Taplin 4th with 113 points, and Richards rounding out the top 5 with 108 points. The final round of VTM season 5 is going to take place at the legendary Mount Panorama circuit in Bathurst – and with the championship being able to go to any of the top four as it is, having the championship finale take place at such a demanding and difficult circuit will certainly put the pressure on!

Tune in for the final round on February 26 at 19:45 GMT to see who prevails!

VSS 2014 Round 5: Brasilia Brings The Action!

Alexander Lauritzen extended his championship lead for THR, whilst Butcher took his second win this season in the Virtual Supertech Series at Brasilia.

With times not quite as competitive as previous seasons, it was Lauritzen who took pole position from surprise front row starter Danny Asbury. Butcher had it all to do from 8th on the grid, and in fact lost 5 places after an horrendous start. However, over the next 7 laps he gained 12 positions to take the lead from Wiesenmueller, who had made a good start from 6th on the grid and got embroiled in a battle with Stranne and Asbury.

Lauritzen himself lost 8 positions on lap 3 thanks to an incident with Tveit, causing both to fall down the field. However, eventually, Lauritzen was to make it up to 2nd place with some hard fought battles.

Race two was just as exciting, with pole sitter Lauritzen, Tveit, Stranne and Butcher battling hard throughout most of the race. Butcher and Lauritzen were constantly swapping positions with one another, and Tveit was getting involved with the THR twins. However, Lauritzen eventually took the lead on lap 14 and held it to the end of the race from Tveit, whilst Stranne took the final podium slot after Butcher slipped to 7th.

Join us for the next round of the VSS, which is of course Cascavel on the 8th Feb!

VTM 5 Round 5: A New Winner at the Österreichring!

Round 5 of the Virtual Touring Masters saw the classic Group 5 field make their way to Austria, to another classic venue. The Österreichring (known later on, in a new configuration, as the A1-Ring and now the Red Bull Ring) played host to a round of VTM 5 that produced yet more shakeups and a new winner. This circuit could be described as Hockenheim, the circuit that hosted round 4, but without the chicanes. A fast and flowing layout greeted a field whose cars felt quite at home through the high-speed turns.

John Munro, part-time TPS commentator, took pole position in his second VTM outing, his Ford Capri beating out Robert Wiesenmueller’s Toyota Celica. Matt Richards took 3rd on the grid, while Erik Tveit and his BMW M1 made a return after missing out on round 4. Championship leader Jesper Taulborg took 5th ahead of Ross McGregor, Rob Taplin, Anders Nilsson and Mate Orban. Kevin Endermann rounded out the top 10 in the highest-qualifying Lancia Beta.

Off the line, Munro had no troubles holding his lead, but Wiesemnueller and Taulborg lost out, moving down to 3rd and 7th respectively by the time the field had cleared turn 1. The former dropped further to 4th as Tveit used the power of the BMW to pass him on the back straight. Munro, Richards and Tveit were the top 3 as lap 1 came to a close. Meanwhile, Taplin began making is way back through the field after having a bad start.

Tveit and Richards began a battle for 2nd with Wiesenmueller lurking in the background. This soon evolved into a 3-way fight as the strengths and weaknesses of the three different cars began to come to the fore. Unfortunately, Tveit hit a wall at the start of lap 6, leaving Richards and Wiesenmueller to fight amongst themselves as Munro continued to slowly pull away.

Taulborg came out of a small scrap with Orban to begin chasing Tveit down. However, Tveit made the job easy as the M1′s sheer power began to overwhelm its tyres, the young Norwegian sliding everywhere. Nilsson had a moment later on, his Capri catching a bump and nearly finding a barrier. As the race reached its halfway point, McGregor made an optimistic move on Tveit that turned into an understeery trip to the barriers.

Tveit and Taplin met each other in the mid top 10, Taplin only just staying with Tveit through slipstreaming, and attempting moves through the corners. Tveit eventually lost 6th to Taplin due to a well-timed move into turn 4 by the Capri driver. But Tveit did not let him walk away, by way yet again of the powerful BMW M1. As Ross McGregor caught up to them, a 4-way scrap evolved when Mate Orban ran wide at turn 4.

A massive incident almost eventuated on lap 24 when Matt Richards ran on to the grass off turn 2, letting Taulborg by for 3rd – and almost losing control and crashing into Taulborg at turn 4. The battle still raged on in the dying stages of the race, Richards pushing incredibly hard to snatch the podium position back from TPS’s most successful driver.

Taplin had pulled away from the fight for 5th, leaving Orban, Tveit and McGregor to squabble over the scraps. It all came to a head at turn 4 on the final lap – McGregor got a monster run on Tveit, but as he completed the move, Tveit caught McGregor’s rear quarter, sending them both around and leaving Tveit with massive damage.

But as this was happening, John Munro had no troubles as he crossed the line to take a dominant first TPS win, just over 10 seconds ahead of Robert Wiesenmueller, who consolidated his championship position in 2nd. Jesper Taulborg won out in the battle with Matt Richards, the two drivers taking 3rd and 4th respectively. Rob Taplin finished 5th, in an improvement on his 7th place qualifying position. Kevin Endermann took 8th, the highest finishing position for any Lancia Beta driver yet.

Taulborg continues to lead the championship, on 121 points as of January 31. Wiesenmueller is still very close behind, on 117, while Taplin is a little further back on 104. Mcgregor is 1 point further back on 103 points, while Matt Richards remains in 5th on 94 points. Mate Orban and David Jundt, 6th and 7th on 64 and 62 points, remain in mathematical contention for the title – and with VTM season 5 being as unpredictable and close as it has been, who knows what will happen in the two remaining rounds?

Round 6 will be held on February 12 at the 1992 layout of Fuji Speedway! Another extremely fast circuit broken up by chicanes, this track retains good flow and will favour drivers who are careful over the 34-lap distance. Be sure to like Touring Pro Series on Facebook and follow @Touring_Pro on Twitter to stay updated!

 

VTM 5 R4: High Speed Thrills at Hockenheim

Touring Pro Series’ historic racing league returned on January 15 to a lost classic racetrack. The Hockenheimring, modelled as it was in 1988, played host to round 4 of the Virtual Touring Masters. The high-speed blasts through the German forest, broken up by high-kerbed chicanes, saw cars exceeding well over 300km/h, setting the stage for a race that was predicted to be dominated by the higher-powered cars and in which slipstreaming was to be crucial.

Rob Taplin took pole position for the first time in his TPS career, breaking the stranglehold that Robert Wiesenmueller has had on the grid’s top spot in VTM season 5. Behind Taplin’s Ford Capri was the Porsche 935 of Ross McGregor, followed by Matt Richards. 4th spot was taken by Kevin Endermann in the Lancia Beta Turbo, the highest qualifying position thus far for the least powerful car in the series. Championship leaders Jesper Taulborg and Robert Wiesenmueller were only able to manage 5th and 8th respectively, while Simon Shepherd took a surprise 6th, using the superior power of the BMW M1 to his advantage on Hockenheim’s long straights.

The race start saw Taplin lose out, initially dropping to 4th, but by the first chicane he had re-taken 3rd from Taulborg. Wiesenmueller had a horror start, dropping down to 14th but working his way up to 10th soon enough. Richards took himself out of 2nd place by spinning under brakes at the third chicane, handing positions to Taplin and Taulborg among many other drivers.

An epic battle for the lead soon formed between Taplin and McGregor, the former taking the lead around the outside of the first chicane after a massive slipstream at the start of lap 4. The two continued to dice, McGregor retaking the lead at the same place on the next lap. Shepherd and Mate Orban also battled for 4th, with Shepherd having the edge thanks to the M1′s superior drive off the corners. By lap 8, Endermann had pitted for damage, Wiesenmuller had passed Gary Lennon for 6th, and McGregor had fallen back from Taplin thanks to braking too late for the Stadium section of the track.

On lap 13, Rhys Gardiner was caught out by the difference in braking distance between his Lancia and David Jundt’s Capri. Under braking at the Ostkurve chicane – nicknamed “Heartbreak Chicane” by the commentators – Gardiner smashed into a barrier, ending his race. Mate Orban ended his race at the same place on the next lap, not being able to see the tyre wall past Shepherd’s M1.

Meanwhile, McGregor retook the lead from Taplin once again, setting the fastest lap along the way, and Wiesenmueller had worked his way up to 4th. Taplin began falling back from McGregor due to tyre wear as the race entered its final quarter. The last lap was marred by two DNFs – the first being Robert Wiesenmueller, whose wheel controller disconnected on a straight, and Bruno Sousa Ferreira, who crashed out after running well in the top 10.

Ross McGregor won the race, with Rob Taplin coming home in 2nd. Jesper Taulborg ran a quiet race to finish 3rd, while Simon Shepherd got his highest finishing position at TPS with a fine 4th. The top 5 was completed by Matt Richards, making a good recovery from his first lap incident.

With penalties not yet applied, Jesper Taulborg leads the championship on 96 points, despite not yet having won a race this season. 2nd is Ross McGregor, only 2 points behind. Robert Wiesenmueller is running 3rd, with Taplin and Richard still occupying 4th and 5th respectively.

The next round of the season will be held on January 29 at another historic venue – 1976′s fast and flowing Österreichring! High speeds now tempered with fast and flowing turns, it will be interesting to see how the lower-powered cars fare against the mighty M1s and 935s!

VMC 2014 Round 4: Rookies Shine at Velopark

The return of the Touring Pro Series from the Christmas break was full of drama, tension and surprises. The ever exciting Virtual Mini Challenge never disappoints!

A new track, never before raced in VMC, was the perfect place for rivalries to reignite and close action to commence. Velopark has its own unique style – a strong mixture of fast straights and tight hairpin bends. With only nine corners, it is also one of the shortest circuits on the calendar. This event would be anyone’s for the taking. Four rounds into the season, the man with the most pressure to handle was Chris Butcher the championship leader. With his recent form it would be difficult to look past him for the win, but would he have it all his own way at Velopark?

Qualifying began with a sense of uncertainty after new drivers Adrian Campfield and Paul Patrick stunned the field by topping the time sheets in practice. A promising debut for Campfield Racing was looking more than likely. It was however a surprise name that set the provisional fastest lap as Rhys Gardiner hauled his Smile Power Mini around the circuit in 58.8 seconds. This time would see the TPS veteran line up in a very impressive P4 for the opener. Two of the top three spots were accommodated by the flying rookies Adrian Campfield and Paul Patrick, who qualified on pole position and Third respectively, a stunning Debut session. It was championship leader Chris Butcher who put his THR Red machine alongside Campfield on the front row with Andrew Waring qualifying Fifth for Airastream after flying in practice. Would the experience of Chris Butcher help him off the line or would Campfield hold his nerves into turn 1?

A great launch by Butcher saw him leap into the lead and pull in front of Campfield heading into turn 1. The only other position change involving the top 5 was Andrew Waring who passed Gardiner on the exit. Many incidents were expected at the controversial first corner so it was a pleasant surprise to see no major incidents. The order remained until the end of lap 2 when Campfield pulled off a perfectly executed move to take lead, leaving room for his team-mate to slot into second. As Adrian pulled away at the front, the main talking point early on in the race was the intense battle between Patrick and Butcher for second with the Campfield Racing driver defending like his life depended on it. His race however came to an abrupt end on lap 15, as he misjudged his braking point heading into turn 5. Too much kerb caused the car to bounce into the wall and bounce back across the track, narrowly avoiding the front end of Butcher’s car. It was a large enough incident to see the debutant retire from the race. Campfield continued to set new fastest laps as he cruised to victory at his first attempt.

By lap 20 a five car scrap for second had developed which ultimately ended in disaster. As the drivers approached the first turn on lap 27, a mistake by Butcher saw four cars bunched together as the proceeded to enter the turn four wide. Gardiner was forced all the way to the outside of the track and unlucky to clip the wall. This sent his car back onto the track taking the charging Miguel Neto out of a strong P6. No driver was particularly at fault, and it was deemed by the drivers themselves as a racing incident. Rhys also picked up some suspension damage which saw him struggle to an eventual fifth placed finish, a great effort. Fourth in the end was Andrew Waring to continue Airastream’s run of form, whilst Rasmus Salo picked his way through the carnage to seal a podium slot for THR Blue. It was championship leader Chris Butcher who won the silver medal but gold, and a debut race victory, was earned by the incredible Adrian Campfield.

Qualifying 2 was a similar story with the latest name on the list of TPS race winners maintaining his 100% record in qualifying with another pole position. A disastrous event for Ice Cold continued with Eric Stranne and Erik Tveit both struggling in qualifying, much like they had in the previous race. Butcher didn’t manage to repeat his Q1 performance, with a disappointing session that would see him start in eighth; a position that would cost him come the race. Smile Power’s Ben Hackeson was the surprise of Q2 taking an impressive third row slot on the grid, his best so far in a young TPS career.

As the cars completed their formation lap it became apparent that front row man Paul Patrick was not taking to the grid, he would start from the pitlane. Campfield led the race but didn’t show the sheer pace he managed in the opener, with Waring and Salo pushing him hard from the get go. Waring was the only man able to keep pace with Campfield, putting him under serious pressure throughout the race. On the penultimate corner of the last lap, the turn 8 hairpin  he dived to the outside but wasn’t able to pull off the outside maneuvre and Adrian was able to hold on for his second win on the bounce.

Overall, Chris Butcher extended his championship lead with Eric Stranne holding onto second and THR Red continue to dominate the Teams Championship. Join us again on the 21st of January for Round 5 of the 2014 Virtual Mini Challenge, live from Taruma!

VTM 5 Round 3: Scintillating Race At Cleveland!

The new-look Virtual Touring Masters, now running the rFactor DRM mod, headed to the United States for round 3 of its fifth season – a race that saw plenty of high-speed, nail-biting action!

Wednesday’s race took place at the unusual airport circuit of Cleveland. Short, fast, wide, flowing and bumpy all at the same time, the runways of Burke Lakefront Airport looked ripe to put on a good race. Amid much drama and controversy over the first two rounds – specifically a horror first round at Spa with much contact all through the field, for which many penalties were dished out – many drivers were looking to finish well and stay out of trouble.

Robert Wiesenmueller took a surprise pole position in his Toyota Celica, running the only lap time under one minute and seven seconds after only joining the server very late in practice. Wiesenmueller edged out Matt Richards, who had to settle for second after topping the timesheets in practice in his Ford Capri. Jesper Taulborg qualified 3rd, edging out Erik Tveit by just over 5 hundredths of a second. Round 1 winner Ross McGregor was only able to manage 10th place.

Wiesenmueller’s race start was not the best, the VMC 2013 champion being beaten off the line by Richards, who led the field into turn 1. Wiesenmueller dropped further back to 3rd thanks to a move up the inside by Tveit. Taulborg lost out as well, dropping to 5th thanks to Tommi Ojala pulling a move on him halfway round the first lap. The first casualty of the race was Rhys Gardiner, the Lancia Beta driver retiring due to a disconnection as the field came around to start lap 2.

More troubles followed for Taulborg, the multiple champion dropping to 6th by way of Rob Taplin, and then on lap 4 hitting an anti-cut at the final chicane which dropped him to 10th. Wiesenmueller re-passed Tveit for 2nd, and promptly began eating away at Richards’ lead. On lap 7, Ojala found himself knocked down to 7th place after contact with Tveit at turn 1. Meanwhile, the battle continued for the lead between Richards and Wiesenmueller, after a scrappy few laps from the former.

Battles began forming throughout the field, highlights being the battle for 10th between Scott Sovik, Lars Brugman and Mate Orban, and the battle for 6th between Tommi Ojala, Sebastian Rosemeyer, and Anders Nilsson. By lap 16, Wiesenmueller grabbed the lead from Richards after the former went too deep into turn 1. A few laps later, Erik Tveit lost both control of his car and his podium position by spinning under brakes at turn 2, which let Rob Taplin onto the provisional podium.

Richards had a scary moment at the end of lap 25, where he very nearly ran into the start of the pit wall, only swerving to avoid it at the last fraction of a second. This being the latest in a series of small overdriving errors by Richards, Taplin began closing in bit by bit. David Jundt had a major incident on lap 30, hitting an anti-cut head on and spinning across the track. This incident caused the Porsche 935s of Mate Orban and Bruno Sousa Ferreira to spin at the same location. Meanwhile, Taulborg dived up the inside of Tveit at turn 1 to take 5th place. Taplin continued his pursuit of Matt Richards, whose gap to Wiesenmueller had further increased to nearly ten seconds.

Lars Brugman grabbed 6th from Erik Tveit, who was increasingly losing grip in his BMW M1. Merely minutes later, mayhem erupted when Lukasz Demolin spun in the path of Tommi Ojala, Ojala heavily impacting the Lancia, while Raul Pereira was also caught up in the incident, rolling his car. Sliding down the track on his roof unfortunately disqualified Pereira from the race. The unfortunate incident between Demolin and Ojala promoted Taulborg to 4th place. Brugman was squeezed for 5th by a recovering Ojala at the final chicane, bouncing off an anti-cut and only just avoiding a wall. Erik Tveit suffered further loss of control of his car, and dropped all the way back to 10th place, and Lars Brugman hit the same anti-cut that took out Jundt, which ended a great run from the Norwegian. But further up front, yet another podium-altering incident happened when Matt Richards suffered a hardware issue and spun, handing Taplin 2nd place.

Robert Wiesenmueller crossed the line in first position, his second win of the season, with Rob Taplin finishing 2nd and matt Richards finishing 3rd. Taulborg took 4th, and Tommi Ojala rounded out to top 5 for VTM round 3 at Cleveland.

Penalties for round 3 have not been applied at the time of writing, but as of December 20, Wiesenmueller is the championship leader on 79 points, with Taulborg not far behind on 71. Round 1 winner Ross McGregor lies third in the standings on 64 points, with Rob Taplin in 4th on 56, and with 50 points, Matt Richards lies in 5th place.

Join us after the Christmas and New Year’s break for the next VTM round at the old layout of the Hockenheimring. The blast through the forest will certainly test the power and braking prowess of these insane Group 5 race cars! See you then!

VSS 2014 Round 3: Fuji Feast!

For the third round of the VSS 2014 season, the long straight at Fuji provided the biggest challenge for the drivers to overcome, with Push-to-Pass strategy and slipstreaming throughout qualifying playing the biggest roles in how drivers attacked the historic Japanese circuit.

For the first qualifying session, we saw packs of cars together on track in an attempt to slipstream each other up the order. Gergo Baldi took pole position with an excellent lap, whilst Tveit took second place. Championship leader Alexander Lauritzen took a good third position, whilst Ryan Walker took 4th position after setting competitive times in practice.

The race itself saw a great start from Baldi and Petzold, whilst Salo and Holm dropped back through the pack. Salo actually got involved in an incident with Petzold, after Petzold had been tapped into a half-spin by Stranne. Salo lost his front splitter and his car started understeering badly, as he dropped back through the pack. Baldi led in the early stages but once Lauritzen had cleared Tveit he set about closing him down.

And close him down he did, the lead swapping several times before Lauritzen managed to get clear of Baldi’s push-to-pass to take his second victory of the season. Tveit took third from Holm, who fought well through the pack to finish 4th and take the fastest lap of the race. 5th place went to Stranne, who also had a good run through the pack, ahead of Airastream team mates Walker and Richards, who made it up from 15th to finish 7th.

In qualifying two, Holm, Baldi, Lauritzen and Salo started tandem slipstreaming, with the result that Holm took pole position from Baldi, with Lauritzen still in 3rd. Asbury took a cracking 4th place with Salo in 5th. Stranne took 6th place, whilst Munro and Walker were the best Airastream drivers, locking out row 4.

After a great qualifying, Holm had technical issues and failed to even start the formation lap. This left Baldi to inherit pole which he duly converted into a race lead at T1, whilst Holm jumped past Asbury to take 4th. Stranne also got by to take 4th, and a slipstreaming battle commenced. Erzen and Navarro made contact on lap 1 which left the pair effectively out of contention.

Then at the end of lap 1, it all fell apart for THR Orange completely. Salo ran a little wide, and spun into the pitlane wall, causing massive damage to his car and ending his race. This left Stranne to fight Lauritzen and Baldi, whilst Munro moved up into 4th to begin a battle with Asbury and Walker.

Lap after lap, the leaders squabbled, with all three leaders taking the lead. At any given point, it was anyone’s guess who would take the victory. Meanwhile, Danny Asbury disconnected, ending a promising race for the American, and Richards spun from a battle with Brugman to drop back to 12th place.

Baldi made a mistake on lap 7, which allowed Stranne and Lauritzen to escape, and Lauritzen duly took the lead from the Swede on the beginning of lap 8, but Stranne used Push-To-Pass on the next lap to take the position back from him. Thus began a game of Push-To-Pass ping pong, with Lauritzen and Stranne on alternate strategies meaning every lap, the lead would change on the long one mile straight. This happened every lap until the penultimate lap, where Stranne made a very small error and tapped Lauritzen, which dropped him back. Stranne still used a Push-To-Pass, his final one, to overtake Lauritzen into T1, but Alex had one remaining. Despite a small error and almost a photo finish, Lauritzen was able to use the extra power to get by at the line.

Behind him, Baldi made a huge error and hit the wall at T5 on the final lap, which allowed Munro a run on him out of the final corner. They crossed the line less than 6 thousandths apart, with Munro taking the final podium slot from the Hungarian THR driver. Walker finished 5th for Airastream, with Palmer ahead of Tveit after a race long battle.

Lauritzen duly extended his championship lead and must be favourite heading into the second half of the season, whilst in the teams championship THR Red closed up and overtook THR Orange due to Salo and Holm not scoring in the second race.

Virtual Mini Challenge 2014 Preview

The winter season of TPS is almost here, and the Virtual Mini Challenge drivers have the honour to race first. Last season is not that long ago, but with the close racing in the FWD cars, we can look forward to lots of action again. The opening race is on November 12th, so it’s about time to give you an overview of the championship.

CALENDAR AND FORMAT

Ice Cold's Stranne on the new Taruma track
Ice Cold’s Stranne on the new Taruma track

VMC will return using its usual format, consisting of two 60-kilometres sprint races with a 10 minute qualifying session for each race. The calendar has been extended to seven events, while there have been small changes with the track choices as well. Norisring and Sebring, two tracks that provided lots of carnage last season, are getting dropped. Instead, the VMC will come back to Jacarepagua, and travel to Velopark and Taruma for the first time. While Velopark has street circuit flair with close walls and chicanes, Taruma is a very fast and flowing circuit.

TEAMS AND DRIVERS

After last season was a complete success, THR is looking strong again. Reigning champion Robert Wiesenmüller will return for THR Red, again alongside last season’s runner-up Chris Butcher. These two won the teams championship easily and scored nine out of twelve race wins. Especially for Butcher, who is still looking for his first title and struggled in his last TPS races, this can be a crucial season.

Toby Davis in the #20 THR Orange car

THR Orange also has the same two drivers as last season: Former Clio champion Toby Davis, who got better and better in the car and scored a race win late in the season, and Tomasz Matuszewski, who showed lots of promise but didn’t have his real breakthrough yet. In THR Blue, everything is new though: After his stunning performances in TOCCS and VV8S, Rasmus Salo is a dark horse for this championship. He will be joined by fellow Finn Tommi Ojala.

The only other team that could win races last season was Ice Cold Racing, and they field their two winners Erik Tveit and Eric Stranne again. Stranne progressed from being a secret favourite to being a real favourite, he won races in TOCCS and VV8S and he finished 3rd last season despite missing an event. Tveit has the same potential, but it is the question if he can stay motivated throughout the whole season.

Walk Racing come back in style
Walk Racing come back in style

These two teams will be under big pressure by a team that no one really expected to sign up and whose signings raised quite a few eyebrows: Walk Racing. Last season was somewhat of a disappointment for the Romanian outfit; quick drivers like Bechtold and Allinson left early and while Jimi Hughes finished inside the top 10, the expectations were a bit higher for the RaceDepartment Champion, proving once again that TPS is a completely different level to anything else in online touring car racing. This time though, Walk’s team is spearheaded by a guy who knows TPS very well: The champion of the first Mini season, Peter Duivelaar. Peter didn’t race that much recently, but with his calm and consistent style and his experience he is an instant favourite. He will be joined by Mr TPS himself, Ryan Callan. Ryan is a multiple race winner in the Clios too, however his recent performances have been quite underwhelming.

In the second Walk team, we will see Mike Bell, who has shown an incredible increase of form outside of TPS, finishing 2nd overall in a French Mini league and winning a race against Rubens Barrichello in a Brazilian league. But once again, TPS is a whole different ballgame so it remains to be seen if he can carry over his form. His teammate is Ariciuc Razvan.

Mike Bell’s own team, Smile Power Racing, has also entered without its team boss. There are lots of new faces in their cars, the most prominent ones are ATCC legend Rhys Gardiner and quick Portugese Luis Fernandes.

Airastream cars look nice again
Airastream cars look nice again

TPS regulars Optimum SimRacing will have an all-Swedish line-up with routineer Jonatan Acerclinth and TPS returnee Kjell Stenbeck, while former OSR driver Scott Sovik will be driving for Airastream alongside team boss Ben Richards. Simspeed Racing will be there with VMC regular Ethan Bass and Dan Allinson, who might be up there with the best drivers if only he could complete seasons.

Madcape Racing made their debut in the last VMC season, and while being successful in other communities, success has been hard to come by in TPS. This season, they built up their line-up to four cars, driven by the Hughes brothers, team boss de Carvalho and South African karting talent Luke Herring.

Finally, there is one of TPS’ best teams that debuts in VMC. EKT Portugal won the teams championship in ATCC, and Miguel Neto is considered to be one of the very best FWD drivers in the world of Race07. His teammate Pedro Amaral has been fast in TOCCS. The big question is how fast they can adapt to the Mini Coopers.

Champion last season, champion again?
Champion last season, champion again?

TouringProSeries Magazine: Issue 25

 tps25.png

The TouringProSeries Magazine returns! The media pulse of TPS has finally been revived after a half-year absence. However, instead of releases twice a month, the magazine will produce one issue per month–meaning more content, more coverage, and more of the thing you just can’t get enough of: the TouringProSeries! Enjoy!

—————————————-
Section A
TPS Rankings Season Begins!

Sometimes the pecking order has to be established. In racing—simracing or otherwise—it’s one of those things that can’t be avoided. How someone stacks up is always measured, weighed and calculated to the thousandth of a second on a race track. It’s the nature of the sport. It’s just how it is. It’s what makes this business of motor racing so competitive. It’s why we love it.

So, let’s get to the business of what exactly TPS 25 is about. As you may have guessed, this issue deals with rankings; however, TPS 25 will not rank the top drivers the championships have to offer. Instead, we will rank the top teams within the TPS.

It’s been quite a year, the most competitive yet. We have a long road to travel on the rankings highway, a road that will end with the 2nd annual rankings podcast, as our expert panel of TPS veterans will once again go over the top 20 TPS drivers of all-time. But as mentioned, for this issue of the magazine our aim is to rank the teams within the TouringProSeries, which has become such an integral part of the championships and driver development.

With TouringProSeries only having recently concluded its summer-season, it has meant a well-deserved break for the drivers and the administrators of TPS before the winter-season kicks off in November.  The break provides an opportunity for teams to retool their lineups for the championships to come, which unfortunately means parting ways with the acquisitions that didn’t quite work out over the summer.

With it being break time around the TPS, let’s establish that pecking order. We have compiled raw data and analytics of the prominent teams of the TPS, and the top 10 organizations will be ranked according to results, longevity, structure, and consistency. All these criteria will mostly be scored based on the 2013 season, which is comprised of 6 championships and 75 races.

A breakdown of each of these criteria is below.

(All categories scored ranging from 1 to 10 points.)

Results:  How a team manages to score points in any series is fully dependent upon where they are classified at the end of a race. Speed, qualifying results, and race craft are all for naught if a good finishing result is not achieved. Therefore, producing results is any competitive team’s goal in any race. The quality of a team’s race results and championship standing results will determine what a team achieves in this category.

Structure: A team’s ability to score championship points and achieve race results isn’t entirely based on speed. A team needs to pair consistent drivers together, because having both pilots finish is vital to the welfare of a club’s results. Good results can also be voided out by post-race penalties, so how a team avoids incident and deals with them plays a huge part in a club’s overall result. How a team produces setups and trains for races will also fall under this purview.

Longevity: Although a flash in the pan can be brilliant to watch, it not only will subside quickly, but can leave more damage than what it’s worth. This concept also applies to simracing teams. Tycoon managers may be able to build super-organizations seemingly overnight, but the methods in which said teams come into fruition can make for an equally quick and spectacular demise. The teams that stand the test of time are the clubs that more often than not get the results that the quickly formed super-teams are seeking. And the outfits with longevity are the organizations that carry respect and influence with fans and drivers alike.

Consistency: Perhaps more important to successful simracing than any other element is consistency. Speed makes names. Fast makes headlines. But consistency wins titles. Without it, a driver is trapped in the terrible void of “Maybe next year…” In the world of simracing teams, the same applies, except doubly so. The top organizations are able to produce across the board, from week-to-week, from series-to-series. These are the true stalwarts of simracing, the ones that exude fear on their competition simply by having their name on the grid.

Each team on the list below was considered for the top 10, however, as seen from the raw data, some clubs simply did not have the results to advance them onward.

Team

Champs Contested

Champ Titles

Race Wins

Champ Podiums

Champ Top 5

Champ Top 10

Core Racing

6

0

0

1

2

3

Ice Cold Racing

12

0

6

1

4

6

THR

17

4

26

7

7

13

Precision Motorsports

8

1

40

4

7

7

Airastream

6

0

0

0

0

0

Optimum Sim Racing

15

0

0

0

0

2

Twister Racing

3

0

0

0

1

3

Concord Motorsports(Team Down Under, 151 Motorsports)

4

0

0

0

0

0

Madcape Racing Black

2

0

0

0

0

0

360 Racing

2

0

0

0

0

1

Walk Racing

7

0

1

1

1

2

The SixthAxis Racing

2

0

0

0

0

1

XSimGear

2

0

0

0

0

2

GT Competizione

1

0

0

0

0

0

Smile Power

4

0

0

0

0

1

Surreal Illusions

2

0

0

0

0

0

ADR

3

0

0

0

0

0

Team EOR

2

0

0

0

0

0

Simspeed Racing

5

0

0

0

1

2

Terra Australis Racing

4

0

0

0

0

1

DPG Motorsports

2

0

0

0

0

1

NoLimit Motorsports

1

0

0

0

0

1

Opium Racing Motorsports

1

0

0

0

0

1

Demolin  Motorsports

1

0

0

0

0

0

TPS SimRacing

3

0

0

0

0

0

EKT Portugal

4

1

2

3

3

4

AJR Motorsports

1

0

0

0

0

0

—————————————-
Section B
Positions 10 through 8

10-Airastream: Founded by brothers Ben and Matt Richards. Airastream have climbed the TPS ladder in style. Though Airastream has struggled to produce high-end results, the team is the 6th most active club within the TPS, amassing 6 appearances over the last year in TPS leagues. The organization has yet to land that marquee name to help elevate them within the top 5, but the mature, stout management of the club’s hierarchy has allowed them to steadily gain popularity in the paddock and on the live broadcasts—partly due to their highly praised livery creations designed by Ben Richards himself. The future is bright for Airastream, and this is a club that could be fast approaching the brink of stardom.

Results: 3
Structure: 5
Longevity: 5
Consistency: 4
Overall: 17

10-Optimum SimRacing: Optimum Simracing has both a sad and inspiring story to tell. Founded some years ago by the young, ambitious Bradley Vanian, Optimum has been the team on the raise since its inception. Using his youth and energy, Vanian is able to scout young drivers, who are fresh on the simracing scene. Sadly however, the truly talented sort to have driven for Optimum feel the need to leave the outfit once they have developed their talent. This has left Optimum to rebuild their lineup on a number of occasions. Even still, the amount of volume the team possesses is impressive to say the least, as the organization has fielded a staggering 15 teams in TPS leagues over the past year, second only to THR. This is a number that would surely see them within the top 5 on this list, save for the unfortunate stat that out of those 15 teams, only 2 have finished within the top 10 in the championship standings by season’s end, giving Optimum one of the worst winning percentages ever seen in TPS history. Jonatan Åcerclinth has been added to management recently to help guide the team into the future, but there is a lot of work cut out for both the Swede and Vanian to reverse the “starter team” reputation of Optimum.

Results: 2
Structure: 6
Longevity: 7
Consistency: 2
Overall: 17

9-XSimGear: Perhaps XSimGear’s best days are behind them in the TPS paddock, but their 2013 campaign  was still commendable. Having only made appearances in ATCC S5 and VMC S2, the outfit has very little volume compared to previous outings within TPS calendar seasons, but regardless of that the team has 2 top 10 championship finishing positions to show for it, making them one of only three clubs to have a perfect winning percentage of teams competed in more than 1 league, and XSimGear is the only club to have such a percentage of teams that have driven in two separate championships (ATCC and VMC). Rhys Gardiner is the man behind such success, but with the Australian reportedly accepting a contract with Smile Power, it’s hard to imagine XSimGear moving up this list next year, or being on it for that matter…

Results: 6
Structure: 3
Longevity: 4
Consistency: 7
Overall: 20

8-SimSpeed Racing: A group of drivers that originally formed in Race 07 league ATCC, SimSpeed has expanded their horizon in 2013. Led by Simon Gardner and Ethan Bass, SimSpeed has quietly been one of the most consistent teams within TPS, scoring 1 top 5 and 2 top 10s. The outfit has also seen a nice amount of traffic in 2013, having made 5 appearances over the year. Like many of the teams outside of the top 5, SimSpeed lack true genius inside the cockpit, as their drivers have been strapped for raw pace. The sticking point for SimSpeed is the fact that the core of this team is comprised of such a solid bunch of drivers, meaning the life-span of this squad won’t be called into question for some time. What will help elevate them even further, is if they are able to translate their winning percentage of 40% to a higher volume of appearances. If that happens, then it is conceivable to see SimSpeed move within the top 5.
Results: 6
Structure: 7
Longevity: 7
Consistency: 5
Overall: 25

—————————————-
Section C
Positions 7 through 4

7-Twister Racing: Perhaps no team has ever debuted within the TPS with more style and hype than FSR mainstays Twister Racing. After signing TPS media-tycoon Danny Asbury to head up the operation, Twister brought in a vast amount of truly talented individuals to the TPS forefront, including iRacing World Championship driver and STC’s most stout pilot Enzo Bonito. Sadly, for all that was made of the club’s entrance, it just didn’t quite live up to the billing on track. Bonito and Asbury’s relationship quickly fell through—not to mention Asbury’s on-track form itself—and the team could not challenge THR or Precision like the outfit had intended to do. Muhammed Patel along with Eduard Malarqui stepped up to become the team’s top tandem, helping lead the club to a top 5 result. Along with their top 5, Twister was able to secure 3 top 10s, making them—along with the aforementioned XSimGear—one of the three clubs to have secured a perfect winning percentage of clubs that contested a championship with multiple teams. Although there is certainly more on the table for this club to achieve, 2014 is looking bleak, as team owner David Dominguez has already expressed his plans to draw the outfit’s attention elsewhere, resulting in Danny Asbury accepting a contract at Optimum. What the future holds for Twister and TPS is up in the air, but Patel and Malarqui want to give VSS another run, whether they’ll have opportunity to do so is another question.
Results: 8
Structure: 6
Longevity: 3
Consistency: 8
Overall: 25

6-Walk Racing: Caramidaru Andrei Bogdan displayed one of the most brazen and charismatic team builds in TPS history in 2012. The outspoken Bogdan, a.k.a. “Mr. C,” riffled together an absurdly talented lineup seemingly overnight, and with it, absolutely blitzed the TPS scene on all fronts, from ATCC to VV8. The core of the team rallied heavily around Alexander Lauritzen, the Danish simracer that has more often than not been at odds with TPS administration due to his sometimes erratic nature. Regardless, Bogdan was able to get through to young Alex, compelling Alexander to also bring onboard countrymen Lasse Sorensen and Simon Kilov—who have been regarded by many around the community as simracing’s black sheep . What followed is the Danish revolution, as these three super-aliens launched Walk amongst the ranks of THR and Precision Motorsports. Predictably, it all came undone when contractual issues left Alexander Lauritzen sending out feelers to other clubs to see what opportunities were on the market. Twister Racing took the bait, signing Lauritzen and swiftly ending the Danish revolution at Walk. Bogdan, emotionally spent, lashed out at Twister manager Danny Asbury and vowed revenge against Twister.  The Walk Racing owner did whatever it took to then sign Stoffel Vandoorne and Peter Duivalaar to make one last stand at greatness. It never took, as the two simracing superstars left the outfit after only a few races, leaving Walk to take a painful fall back to mediocrity. Caramidaru had to withdraw himself from the simracing world altogether after his father took ill, leaving Walk with little direction and a fleeting hold within TPS. Even still, the compelling story and results of Walk Racing left a mark on TPS during the 2013 season, and without question this was one of the best clubs in tin-tops this calendar year.

Results: 8
Structure: 8
Longevity: 3
Consistency: 7
Overall: 26

5-Core Racing: Core Racing could be regarded as a model for how to build a simracing team. Darren Adams has been methodical and calculating, whilst still providing that element of fun and excitement to his team, as the entire Core Racing bunch seemingly gets along perfectly. Core has made 6 appearances in TPS leagues this year, and hold a tremendous winning percentage of 50%, not to mention the club took a highly coveted podium finish in TOCCS. Core has become a household name around TPS due to their ability to be relevant in so many different leagues and cars, highlighted by top 5s in TOCCS and VV8S. The only real hiccup in their 2013 campaign revolves around star pilot Chris Hack and his dual role as an Ice Cold Racing driver in VV8S and a Walk Racing pilot in ATCC.  Originally, the speculation was that Hack had left, but the Brit returned to Core for TOCCS, leaving many to wonder where Hack’s loyalties truly lie. Regardless, Core is a team to watch, and with a solid foundation to build upon from 2013, 2014 looks to take the club to new heights.

Results: 7
Structure: 8
Longevity: 9
Consistency: 8
Overall: 32

4-EKT Portugal: Pound for pound it may be fair to call EKT Portugal the best team in TPS history. Simply put, their results have been nothing short of stunning.  They are the last of the three teams—Twister and XSimGear included—to sport a perfect winning percentage, but not only does EKT have that, but their podium percentage is an absurd 75%. The only reason that percentage is not 100% is because the 3 other teams to be on podium in the one league they competed in were all also under the EKT umbrella, meaning the teamed locked itself out of the podium. Like we said, absurd!. EKT Portugal is the only team in TPS history to own all spots on a championship podium by season’s end. Now, it needs to be said for clarification that the league in which this happened was ATCC S5, and one of the teams EKT Portugal locked out the podium with was, in fact, named the Hardmodding Team. This was due to the fact that only 3 instances of an organization were allowed in a league at the time, a rule that has only recently been amended. Therefore our analysts saw fit to count Hardmodding as, indeed, a fourth instance of EKT Portugal.

The downside to EKT Portugal is quite simple. Outside of ATCC, the team does not exist within TPS, as the outfit refuses to contest any other championship. What’s more, EKT may very well have lost the championship in ATCC S5 if either Walk Racing didn’t collapse, or Precision Motorsports were able to pair a sufficient driver with Jack Keithley. Star driver Miguel Neto has reportedly expressed that TPS is perhaps too tough to be dominated, and would rather have EKT focus their attention where domination is more likely. In fact, the rest of EKT Portugal is so put off by the competition within the TPS, that team boss Francisco Villar can get so little support from his fellow EKT mates. The Portuguese leader has had to contest in other TPS series under the THR umbrella, raising further doubts that EKT will ever be seen within TPS outside of ATCC. Even still, what EKT Portugal has done in ATCC is impressive, and it simply cannot be overlooked. Whether or not EKT and their vast lineup ever decide to challenge the top rung at TPS is still quite an interesting prospect.

Results: 10
Structure: 8
Longevity: 8
Consistency: 8
Overall: 34

—————————————-
Section D
Positions 3 through 1

3-Ice Cold Racing: In a private interview, ICR team boss Erik Tveit was asked about the goal behind the team’s establishment. The young Norwegian said, “We want to beat THR, we want to be the new THR.” Since then, Ice Cold has been on a charge. ICR has quietly put together an elite lineup that has seen Eric Stranne bloom into a potential champion, as is the case with Tveit himself. The team has also seen names like Adrian Holm and Ross McGregor join the fray, though only for a brief time. ICR is only 1 of 5 teams to have scored a race win over the past year at TPS, and is 1 of only 3 teams to have secured a win in multiple leagues. Not only that, but ICR has seen a tremendous amount of volume this year, showcasing 12 teams across every TPS series outside of ATCC. Despite such a vast amount of participation, the club holds a 50% winning percentage, meaning this is a club that is truly consistent. In fact, ICR holds solid statistics on every front. The only thing missing from their résumé is a championship title. 2014 holds very nice prospects for ICR, especially in VMC S3, where odds makers already have ICR picked as an early favorite.

Tveit’s managing style is very laid back, much like that of Vanian’s of Optimum, except something about the ICR structure is able to blend young and old, fast and slow, and it all feels quite a home in the ICR paddock. Gary Lennon is a part of the team’s hierarchy, and is one of the key reasons ICR has as much credibility as it does. With the new season on the horizon, will Tviet and Lennon be able to secure the team a title and fulfill the team’s initial goals of surpassing THR? Perhaps, but even if they don’t ICR is here to stay.

Results: 9
Structure: 8
Longevity: 9
Consistency: 9
Overall: 35

2-Precision Motorsports: There was much debate about where to rank perhaps the strongest simracing team in the world. Abroad, this is a no-brainer, as Precision may only realistically be bested by iRacing’s Team Redline. But when it concerns the confines of the TPS, Precision, as unfathomably good as their 2013 season has been, had to be ranked 2nd. Before we delve into details, we’ll look at the raw numbers. Precision won 40 races. FORTY RACES! Let’s put that in perspective. Out of the 6 championships used to comprise the 2013 season, there were only 75 races. 75 races and 40 wins—you don’t even need one of our fancy percentages to realize how ridiculous that amount of wins is in a calendar season. Out of the 8 Precision teams we’ve seen this year, 7 of them have cracked the top 5, and 4 have made the podium. To put that number in perspective, out of 17 THR teams to have participated this year, only 7 have made the podium. Simply put, Precision’s top 10, top 5, and podium winning percentages are tremendous, especially when you consider they have been the 4th most active club within TPS over that time.

With so many good things to say about this team, it’s hard to imagine that any club should be ranked ahead of them… but… here’s the bad. In short, why this team is number 2 only comes down to the number 1. That is one championship title. ONE! It literally makes no sense how that number can be so low. All the talent is there, and as seen, the results as well. Yet, there is only one title to show for it. The knock on Precision is that there seems to be a lack of direction from the outfit. That amidst their tremendous success, they can let little blips on the radar throw them off course. Not only that, but the club has had intense instances of in-fighting as well. Precision drivers have seemingly fought against one another like rivals, highlighted by the absurd situation in VV8S where Simon Kilov threatened to crash into teammate Jeffrey Ritveld during the race. It’s moments like this that make any organization look unprofessional, and it has stuck with Precision competitors, as Adrian Holm only recently took shots at PM and its drivers by releasing the statement, “I feel that the God given talent some guys possess belongs somewhere else.”

Despite this, Precision is still the team every top driver wants to be a part of, as they offer exposure that not many organizations can. Jack Keithley can largely be credited for PM success in TPS, and as long as Keithley doesn’t jump ship, PM will have a presence inside the tin-tops. But will Precision buckle down and bring some of the clinical finishing that the whole world has been accustomed to seeing from them in FSR to the TPS? That remains to be seen, but if they don’t, their 2014 campaign won’t see them get any higher up this list than where they finished in 2013.

Results: 10
Structure: 8
Longevity: 9
Consistency: 9
Overall: 36

1-THR: Let’s be honest here. Halfway through the 2013 season, THR looked cooked. Done. Finished. Seriously, it looked like TPS’ household mega-team had finally seen its day passed. Precision were throttling the tin-top giants. THR had lost star pilot William Levesque, Jesper Taulborg was seemingly being outclassed at every corner by mega-alien Jack Keithley, and Toby Davis’ bag of superior setups looked like they belonged on your mom’s estate car compared to what Precision was bringing to the table.

So what the hell happened that sees THR still as TPS’ top outfit for 2013? Well… damn it all if this team doesn’t know how to fight. Week after week, race upon race, THR found ways to gain small improvements in pace and build off of them. Catching up to Precision wasn’t a quick fix–it took months of tinkering, examination, and structural changes. And in the mists of secret team meetings and star driver blow ups, THR was able to recreate itself. Trailing in both TOCCS and VV8S–two of the strongest leagues at the TPS–the comeback was on!

One round, then two, and soon three. Before long, Precision Motorsport may have won the race, but THR would take the remaining places on the podium, surpassing PM in the standings. The statistics from the THR camp are also worth marveling over. They generated the highest volume of any team within the TPS this year, as the outfit has fielded a staggering 17 teams over the 2013 season. What’s more, THR is broken up into several tiers; meaning, where Precision is a squad made up of the truly elite of simracing, THR don’t shy away from signing developing drivers and mid-fielders. Despite that, only 4 THR teams have failed to make the top 10 by season’s end. When you compare that to Optimum only being able to get 2 teams out of 15 inside the top 10, it stands as a testament of how well the THR strategists set up their driver pairings and how well their setups work. And let’s not forget the most important stat: 4 championship titles, which is the sole reason THR has bested PM for 2013.

We here at the magazine have had our fair share of run-ins with THR, as the team’s management has sent in a few scathing reviews of articles written about them. Meaning we’re usually not the bunch to gush over THR, but their 2013 is certainly worth a tip of the cap—okay, maybe a round of applause too… with perhaps a standing ovation thrown in there for good measure. Wait… think that’s too much?  Well, so do I, but that’s the only way this thing gets past our in-house editor Ivan, who *cough* happens to be THR *cough*.

That said—and all joking aside—we can’t ignore the fact that Precision had a vice grip on several championships. People could say that Precision simply walked away, didn’t care enough, and THR picked up the pieces. And those people would have a point because we’d all be lying to ourselves if we didn’t think Precision could beat THR. But that’s not what this is about. Simracing isn’t about who could, it’s about who does. That’s what racing is about. Precision tried to become the strongest tin-top organization in the simracing world without giving it their full attention. And it was all going great, until they were challenged. Forced into the same situation they put THR into, Precision couldn’t, or wouldn’t, fight back. And what’s the point in racing if there’s no fight in you?

Results: 9
Structure: 10
Longevity: 10
Consistency: 10
Overall: 39

2014 is just about here, and all the teams on this list and more will look to print their name in the TPS history books. But for now, they’ll still have to fight through THR to do that. And we should warn you… those guys don’t go down easy.

—————————————-
Section E
TPS Top 20 Podcast

Next up on the rankings queue is the highly debated annual driver rankings. Last year Jesper Taulborg was crowned the greatest driver in TPS history, but is the Ice Man under threat from Jack Keithley heading into the 2013 rankings? Find out in a few weeks’ time when our expert panelist sit down and hash out the top 20 TPS drivers of all-time, as revised from 2012. Stay tuned!

—————————————-
Section F
Livery Contest

You’ve asked about it, and we’ve heard your cries! The livery contest will conclude with the next issue of the magazine, as the new Picasso award winner will be announced! Until then!

TPS Magazine Staff
Chief Editor-Danny Asbury
Senior Editor-Ivan Navarro
Cover Design-Ben Richards
Reporter-Caramidaru Andrei Bogdan
Journalist-Rhys Gardiner
Journalist-Jonatan Acerclinth
Photographer-Jesper Taulborg

Winter calendars announced!

The TouringProSeries will be running four series this winter:

  • The fifth edition of the much loved Virtual Touring Masters, using the DRM mod for rFactor.
  • The 2014 and fourth Virtual Supertech Series, which saw arguably the highest quality driving seen in TPS in the 2013 season, once again using Game Stock Car.
  • The 2014 and third Virtual Mini Challenge. The start league continues it’s penchant for exciting close racing, while still attracting the top drivers. Using Game Stock Car, naturally.
  • The brand new Virtual Carrera Cup, which has generated unprecedented levels of excitement, using the Flat 6 Enduracers mod for rFactor.

So plenty for everyone to get their teeth into during the cold, lonely winter months! And if you;re not racing, plenty to keep you entertained, as all four will be beamed live across the internet with full commentary. As ever, the high levels of professionalism, from drivers, administrators, stewards, designers, producers and commentators, the TPS is famous for will be carried on and yet improved upon.

Click the relevant series logo in the menu above to find out more details!